Volunteer Station Dashboards are updated daily between 8-10am. To access, go to Smart Atlas and then select your location.

The Information Centre link will also provide access - enter brigade name and then select the Volunteer Dashboard link on the right hand side under Related Links.

Useful documents

See Volunteer initiatives and projects > Model rules for an update on the Model Rules project.
Note: We are currently advising volunteer brigades and forces not to put local effort into re-writing their own rules or constitutions as we will ultimately provide Fire and Emergency documents that are fit for our new organisation.

Sample management structure charts:

Sample brigade orders:

Best practice guide to brigade management structures

Good brigade management structures ensure the efficient and effective operation of the brigade. Brigade members are encouraged to take responsibility for a part of the brigade management thereby ensuring the load is evenly shared amongst all members.

Within smaller brigades it may be impractical to have each member assigned to only one area of responsibility and there may need to be some additional areas assigned.

This best practice guide aims to provide some assistance to brigades looking to set up a more formalised structure, but is not intended to be a comprehensive or prescriptive tool.

Key reasons for adopting this approach are:

  • To spread the workload of the brigade equally across the brigade.
  • To reduce the Chief Fire Officer’s workload so they can spend more time concentrating on managing their brigade.
  • So brigade members can take ownership in the brigade.
  • To allow newer members to feel that they are contributing in the running of the brigade.
  • To allow members that are not as active in the response mode to contribute at an equal level.
  • To allow members to become a ‘jack of one trade’ instead of a ‘master of none’.
  • To improve an officer’s delegation skills.
  • To provide a good span of control.
  • To fully utilise the skill sets that each individual brings to the brigade.
  • To provide good succession planning for future brigade management.

The following are templated role descriptions for standard roles within brigades: 

Sample brigade management structure charts:

Best practice guide to brigade management structures

Good brigade management structures ensure the efficient and effective operation of the brigade. Brigade members are encouraged to take responsibility for a part of the brigade management thereby ensuring the load is evenly shared amongst all members.

Within smaller brigades it may be impractical to have each member assigned to only one area of responsibility and there may need to be some additional areas assigned.

This best practice guide aims to provide some assistance to brigades looking to set up a more formalised structure, but is not intended to be a comprehensive or prescriptive tool.

Key reasons for adopting this approach are:

  • To spread the workload of the brigade equally across the brigade.
  • To reduce the Chief Fire Officer’s workload so they can spend more time concentrating on managing their brigade.
  • So brigade members can take ownership in the brigade.
  • To allow newer members to feel that they are contributing in the running of the brigade.
  • To allow members that are not as active in the response mode to contribute at an equal level.
  • To allow members to become a ‘jack of one trade’ instead of a ‘master of none’.
  • To improve an officer’s delegation skills.
  • To provide a good span of control.
  • To fully utilise the skill sets that each individual brings to the brigade.
  • To provide good succession planning for future brigade management.

 

Last modified: